Wiring the Hospital

One hospital in a small town was a two story building, but only the first floor had been completed.  The hospital controllers wanted to finish the upper floor and I was given the job of wiring it.

When the lower floor was constructed and completed, part of the conduit for the upper floor had been installed, mostly up and down the stairwells, so as to provide wiring access to the lower floor.  However I encountered a problem with the conduit, because some of it was too small for the wiring I had to do.

It was about this time that advancements in wire manufacturing changed the type of insulation used on wiring.  I was able to put more wire in a space than previously, but I still had to stretch the code to the limit to get it all wired.

On this job a brick wall had been built as a decorative statement in the entry area.  When it was completed the building inspector said it was not a good job and that it had to be torn down to the floor and redone.  When it was rebuilt the inspector came again and stated that it was still not good enough and must be torn down and rebuilt yet again.  By this time the bricklayers were getting a little angry.

I only remember something like that happening to electricians one time.  The architect of a project had called for “exposed conduit” wiring.  When the job was completed she didn’t like the look and wanted changes made.

You will always find people in the trades that do rough work, or disrespect the work area or customer.  For instance while working on a job in an Elk’s Lodge building we had to work in an office occupied by a couple of lawyers.  The office was being remodeled, so while we were working in their office they moved out temporarily

A couple of plumbers were doing ceiling work in the office.  Instead of moving the desks out of the way and using ladders, they stood on the desks.  Boy!  Some words flew when the lawyers came back in the office.

I suspect that those plumbers didn’t like lawyers very much.

I do know some lawyers who didn’t like plumbers after that.

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